15 October 2017 Robert Peake & Paul Stephenson

15. 10. 2017 Robert Peake & Paul Stephenson will read new works from their new poetry books. Reading will begin 19hr at The Tennessee Bar = 2, rue André Mazet 75006 Paris, France.

Robert Peake is a British-American poet living near London. His full-length collection The Knowledge is now available from Nine Arches Press. His previous short collections include The Silence Teacher (Poetry Salzburg, 2013) and Human Shade (Lost Horse Press, 2011).

Robert grew up on the U.S.-Mexico border, in the small desert farming town of El Centro, California. He studied poetry at the University of California, Berkeley and in the Master of Fine Arts in Writing Program at Pacific University, Oregon.

His poems have appeared in a wide range of journals and anthologies including North American ReviewPoetry InternationalIotaMagma PoetryAcumen, and The North. Robert’s essays and reviews have appeared in Poetry International, the Chicago Sun-Times online, and The Huffington Post. His own website consistently ranks as a top poetry blog.

Robert’s poems have received commendations in the Rattle Poetry Prize, the Atlantic Monthly Student Writing Contest, the 2007 James Hearst Poetry Prize, the 2009 Indiana Review Poetry Prize, the 2013 Troubadour International Poetry Prize, and three Pushcart Prize nominations.

Since relocating to England with his wife, Valerie and cat, Miranda in 2011, Robert has given a variety of readings in the UK. He also created the Transatlantic Poetry reading series to bring poets from both sides of the Atlantic together for live online poetry readings, and also built poet.tips–a crowd-sourced poetry recommendation website.

Robert offers one-to-one feedback and support through the UK Poetry Society Poetry Surgeries programme for the Hertfordshire area.

Robert is a technology consultant for PeakePro and Senior Associate with Next Action Associates.

For a full curriculum vitae, click here.

www.robertpeake.com

“I Was Born to Small Fish.”

-from a mis-translated line by Pablo Neruda

They fill the stream with dashes,
clot in dark collections by the bank,
a clutch of minnows sprayed
into life, like torpedoes
from a pregnant submarine.

And I am born unto them,
child of the sardine, goldfish,
pollywog—whatever can swim
in a thimble, dodge change
flipped into a fountain
for luck.

I am not the son
of the marlin, the sturgeon—
the sunfish, around whom
jellyfish revolve like planets.
The smallest of fish
is sufficient to be my mother.

I am from this line of stream-
swimmers, gulf-swimmers, fish
at the mercy of eddies
and wakes, schooling together,
and bursting apart, confusion
and numbers our only defence,
this line, this arc—

hundreds flashing
through a shaft of light—
I call them “family” and
“comrades,” call them
my fish, small fish, birth-right.

 

15 October 2017 Paul Stephenson & Robert Peake

15. 10. 2017 Paul Stephenson & Robert Peake will read new works from their new poetry books. Reading will begin 19hr at The Tennessee Bar = 2, rue André Mazet 75006 Paris, France

Paul Stephenson grew up in Cambridge. He studied modern languages and linguistics and then European Studies. He has spent many years living and working in France, Spain, the Netherlands and Belgium. He completed the Jerwoord/Arvon mentoring scheme and has been published widely in magazines. His most recent pamphlet is ‘Selfie with Waterlilies‘ (Paper Swans Press, 2017). He has published two others: ‘Those People‘ (Smith/Doorstop, 2015) won the Poetry Business competition judged by Billy Collins while ‘The Days that Followed Paris‘ (HappenStance, 2016) was written in the wake of the 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris. He has a diary/blog at www.paulstep.com. You can read a recent interview with Paul here: https://paperswans.co.uk/5-questions-paul-stephenson/

 

Valuation

My mother used to tell people
our house was a pub
in the eighteenth century.
I could see the cobwebbed crates

and woodworm-riddled benches.
Together among the pewter,
we believed in our public house,
conscious of the cavity beneath us.

My father, a true landlord,
would say to every visitor
as they got up to go and he didn’t,
The door is always open.

One day a man with a measure
came to price the place for sale.
Pointing needed doing.
There was no cellar.

 

Marc Nasdor 17. 9. 17

MARC NASDOR is a poet and musician; a native of Baltimore, Maryland who has lived in New York City since 1980. In the 1980s and 1990s he co-produced international literary festivals, and poetry radio, with The Committee for International Poetry. He was Program Director at Poets House and the Gas Station. After a 14-year hiatus from literary activities, Roof Books published Sonnetailia in 2007. His current manuscript is Insurgentes / Avenues. In addition, Nasdor (aka DJ Poodlecannon) is known as a mixed-world-music DJ, whose set reflects the diversity of languages in New York. He has also DJ’d in Budapest and Pécs (Hungary), Nantes (France), Mexico City and Mérida (Yucatan).

http://brooklynrail.org/2016/11/poetry/nasdor-insurgentes-avenues

DJ Playlists:
https://www.mixcloud.com/poodlecannon

Original Compositions:
https://www.soundcloud.com/poodlecannon
http://www.reverbnation.com/poodlecannon

John High 27. 8. 2017

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27. 8. 2017 John HighHélène Cardona and Antonia Alexandra Klimenko will read new works from their new poetry books. Reading will begin 19hr at The Tennessee Bar

A recipient of four Fulbright Fellowships, John High has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts (fiction and translation), the Witter Bynner Foundation, and Arts International. He is a former member of the Moscow Club Poetry and a founding editor of Five Fingers Review. Poet, translator, Zen monk—he has written ten books, including the novel, The Desire Notebooks. vanishing acts is the fourth volume in the interconnected series of poetry collections following here, a book of unknowing, and you are everything you are not. His translations of contemporary Russian poetry include books by Nina Iskrenko, Ivan Zhdanov, and Aleksei Parshchikov; he is the chief editor for Crossing Centuries—The New Generation in Russian Poetry. His translations of Osip Mandelstam have appeared in The Nation, Fulcrum, Denver Quarterly, Pen America, Ugly Duckling Presse, and Poetry. Recent readings include Istanbul, Moscow, St. Petersburg, Paris, Hangzhou, Venice, and New York. Recent work has appeared in Verse, New American Writing, The Brooklyn Rail, Ugly Duckling Presse (6×6), Brooklyn Paramount, Poems by Sunday, Visceral Brooklyn, Conjunctions, Poetry Northwest, and Paris Lit Up. Poems from this four-book series have been translated into French and Russian for the Paris Ivy Series and The St. Petersburg literary journal, Kreshchatik. He has taught creative writing and literature in Moscow, Istanbul, Hangzhou, and San Francisco, and currently directs the MFA Creative Writing Program at LIU Brooklyn.

 

​​​​​​(Day 25. “Chao Chao Asks About Death,” ​​​​​​​Book of SerenityKoan#63)

The boy stumbled over the words catching himself in weeds as sounds of laughter flew up from the circus & onto hills & into sentences & over soda pops & all about these vanishing acts into a feeling of you just you, not so easy—go easy, go easy man because syllables get stuck in places of beginning & ending & movies she gestures forth—go forth go forth—& all this while eyeing a horse & a saddle & a clock by the tents & jugglers, painted faces, fire swillers swallowers star gazers & what a carnival, what a night, right, & what, just what are these things these 10,000 things these blurrings & visitations of things seen in an eye of a blind artist or if not in each turning & churning & birding of clowns & merry go rounds & fleeting moments fleeting language itself not so unfullfilled yet hesitant, you touch the handles of her bicycle—hesitant & why hesitant when this wala wala boom boom hooray you say can hour the clock & clean the sock, hour the wow & heal the cow, hour the freedom & green or yellow or fusia balloons going up up up & balls in the air, all up in the air yes all up in the air & meaning—there you have it—shooting out of all these magic rabbits & hankies you pull from a hat 

http://johnhighpoet.tumblr.com/about

https://m.facebook.com/johnhighpoet/

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/harriet/2016/03/everything-for-me-is-translation-an-interview-with-john-high

Hélène Cardona 27. 8. 2017

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27. 8. 2017 Hélène Cardona, John High, and Antonia Alexandra Klimenko will read new works from their new poetry books. Reading will begin 19hr at The Tennessee Bar

Hélène Cardona was born in Paris and raised all over Europe before settling in the US. She earned her MA in American literature from the Sorbonne, where she wrote her thesis on Henry James. She is the author of 6 books, more recently the bilingual collections Life in Suspension, called “a vivid self-portrait as scholar, seer and muse” by John Ashbery, and Dreaming My Animal Selves, described by David Mason as “liminal, mystical and other-worldly.” Cardona’s luminous poetry, hailed as visionary by Richard Wilbur, explores consciousness, the power of place, and ancestral roots. It is poetry of alchemy and healing, a gateway to the unconscious and the dream world.

Her translations include Beyond Elsewhere (Gabriel Arnou-Laujeac), winner of a Hemingway Grant; Ce que nous portons (Dorianne Laux); Walt Whitman’s Civil War Writings for WhitmanWeb, and Birnam Wood (José Manuel Cardona).

Acting credits include Chocolat, Jurassic World, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, The Hundred-Foot Journey, etc. For Serendipity, she co-wrote with Peter Chelsom & Alan Silvestri the song Lucienne, which she also sang.

Dappled with transparent imagery, like the Mediterranean sunlight she grew up with, Hélène Cardona’s poems offer a vivid self-portrait as scholar, seer and muse.
—John Ashbery

 

 

To Kitty, Who Loved the Sea and Somerset Maugham
                                For whatever we lose (like a you or a me)
                                It’s always ourselves we find in the sea 
                                                                      ―E.E. Cummings

The angel who smells of my childhood
My mother, piano and oboe
Whose face the icon reflects
Auburn hair like a Modigliani
Eyes the color of rain
Light caught by surprise
Whose presence the absence reveals
Whose laughter burns snow
Whose warm breath I breathed
This morning as I woke
The scent of gardenias whispering
I never left you
From Life in Suspension (Salmon Poetry, 2016)
First published in Poems Dead and Undead (Everyman’s Library)

 

À Kitty, qui aimait la mer et Somerset Maugham
                                      Car quoi qu’on perde (comme un toi ou un moi)
                                      C’est toujours soi que dans la mer on retrouvera
                                                                         ―E.E. Cummings
L’ange aux senteurs de mon enfance
Ma mère, piano et hautbois
Dont le visage se reflète sur l’icône
Cheveux auburn, tel un Modigliani
Les yeux couleur de pluie
Volée par la lumière
Et son absence qui ravive sa présence
Son rire qui enflamme la neige
Son souffle chaud que je respire encore
Et ce matin au réveil
Le parfum des gardénias qui murmurent
Je ne t’ai jamais quittée
De La Vie Suspendue (Salmon Poetry, 2016)